Nursing School Students: Employment Prospects For Nurses

August 11th, 2009

Anyone considering the time and money that a formal education program requires probably has employment prospect as top of their list of questions that need answers. Those considering nurse as profession are no different.

While most career paths have greatly suffered in that capacity with the recent economic upheaval, nursing is one profession that so far has been sheltered from the storm. In fact demand for qualified nurses, both private practitioners and for health centers and hospitals, have seen an upward trend over the last twenty years that does not seem to lose steam in its growth.

One reason is socio-demographic – or should that be two reasons? First, a substantial number of nurses in activity today are baby-boomers or older, often gifted with a guaranteed pension based on salary. So all those workers are looking forward to retirement, which should be starting over the next five to ten years.

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Exploring a Variety of Nurse Practice Settings

August 7th, 2009

By Melanie Ullman
If you are currently in a nursing school program and wondering where you will apply your skills upon graduation you should know that the sky is the limit. Nursing is a helping profession that allows for application of skills in many different settings. Unlike other professions, nursing is very versatile and there is always a need for qualified nursing professionals across a broad spectrum of areas. Finding your nursing niche may take some time but there is definitely a practice setting to suit anyone considering or pursuing the field of nursing.

One of the main practice settings for a nurse is the hospital. Most people are introduced to the hospital nursing setting while in a nursing school program through a clinical. The hospital setting is considered by some to be formal. It is also one of the few practice settings that allows a nurse to experiment with a variety of specialties. In one hospital alone you can gain experience working in neonatal or pediatrics, medical/surgical, the emergency room, the operating room and even the intensive care unit.

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Nursing School Grants And Scholarships

August 6th, 2009

By Melanie Ullman

Going into a nursing program to pursue nursing as a career is very beneficial. You can expect to not only obtain a valuable career but also have the money to pay for your education. There is currently a tremendous shortage of nurses all across the country and unfortunately it is only expected to get worse.

To encourage people to pursue the field of nursing there are numerous federal, state and private funds available in the form of grants and scholarships to help people fund a nursing education. What’s great is that grants and scholarships do not have to be repaid so it’s basically free money to become a nurse!

There are many grants and scholarships available to cover the cost of an education for a nursing school program from the federal government. No matter if you are seeking a two year associates degree or you have chosen to complete a four year degree there is money available.

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Masters Level Nursing Programs

July 25th, 2009

Nurses are dedicated to caring for the sick and providing compassion and comfort while doing so. It is a profession that is very much in demand because if its job stability and pay. Many people are familiar with the Registered Nurse or R.N. programs which require an associate degree level of education. There are also Bachelors of Science of Nursing (B.S.N.) programs which are the four year degree programs found at many colleges and universities. There is demand for both R.N. and B.S.N. nurses, but there is also a huge demand for advanced practice nurses. The best ways to become an advanced practice nurse is by completing a master’s level nursing program, which can be done through a ‘traditional’ nursing school or even via nursing programs at community colleges.

There are many accredited master’s level nursing programs available throughout the United States. Depending on your chosen specialty completion of such a program will take between two and three years. To apply for a master’s level program you must first have received your Bachelors degree, or BSN. In addition, as with many other masters’ programs, you’ll need to take the LSAT or other master’s level quantitative test will be required.

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Nursing School Program Degrees

July 22nd, 2009

The profession of nursing is dedicated to caring for the sick and providing compassion and comfort while doing so. It is a profession that is very much in demand because if its job stability and pay. Many people are familiar with the Registered Nurse or R.N. programs which require an associate degree level of education.

There are also Bachelors of Science of Nursing (B.S.N.) programs which are the four year degree programs found at many colleges and universities. There is demand for both R.N. and B.S.N. nurses, but there is also a huge demand for advanced practice nurses. The best ways to become an advanced practice nurse is by completing a master’s level nursing program.

If you already have your RN certification, you might want to consider one of the RN-to-BSN programs available, since this can reduce the time and requirements necessary. Depending on your situation, you may also find that your employer is willing to foot the bill for an RN-to-BSN program is you agree to continue employment there.

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